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Ποιοι είναι οι δημοσιογράφοι που συλλαμβάνονται στην Τουρκία; Ένα αποκαλυπτικό ρεπορτάζ

This powerful series of tweets says all you need to know about the state of Turkey’s democracy

Από τον βρετανικό Independent: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/this-powerful-series-of-tweets-says-all-you-need-to-know-about-the-state-of-turkeys-democracy-a7165126.html

Erdogan’s post-coup purges have targeted at least 50,000 people

Φωτο: Security officers guard secure the area as President Erdogan arrives to give a speech to supporters following a failed coup attempt Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images

Turkish president Recep Erdogan has ordered that at least 131 media outlets suspected of inciting or sympathizing with this month’s failed military coup be permanently shut down.

That includes three news agencies, 16 TV channels, 23 radio stations, 45 daily newspapers, 15 magazines, and 29 publishing houses, according to Al Jazeera.

Erdogan’s post-coup purges have targeted at least 50,000 people — including soldiers, police, civil servants, and academics — suspected of inciting or sympathizing with the military uprising. At least 15,000 have been detained so far.

Journalists — long a favorite target of Erdogan’s — have also been hastily targeted in the post-coup crackdown. As of Thursday, 42 journalists had been detained, according to Turkish analyst and journalist Mahir Zeynalov.

Zeynalov has been sharing photos on Twitter of the journalists as they are hauled away by Turkish police.

These are just a few of them:

Nazli Ilicak, 72 years old veteran of Turkish journalism. A staunch supporter of liberal democracy. Now under arrest

Bulent Mumay. A hard-working man, who made enemies among Erdogan’s inner circle for top-notch journalism. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/h8UXFAsUoR

Bunyamin Koseli. We used to be roommates. An excellent mind, great investigative reporter. Jailed for doing his job.pic.twitter.com/xBBWDjxzDB

View image on Twitter

Bunyamin Koseli. We used to be roommates. An excellent mind, great investigative reporter. Jailed for doing his job.pic.twitter.com/xBBWDjxzDB

Arda Akin. Known for columns that deeply disturbed the government. Roared when necessary, without fear. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/k7qVvOxsE0

View image on Twitter

Nazli Ilicak, 72 years old veteran of Turkish journalism. A staunch supporter of liberal democracy. Now under arrestpic.twitter.com/UYrVRAncOK

Bulent Mumay. A hard-working man, who made enemies among Erdogan’s inner circle for top-notch journalism. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/h8UXFAsUoR

View image on Twitter

Arda Akin. Known for columns that deeply disturbed the government. Roared when necessary, without fear. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/k7qVvOxsE0

Busra Erdal. Veteran court reporter. Revered & reviled, made enemies because she never stopped writing. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/oEKAp9o1tO

View image on Twitter

Busra Erdal. Veteran court reporter. Revered & reviled, made enemies because she never stopped writing. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/oEKAp9o1tO

Cemal Kalyoncu. He knew nothing in his life besides reporting and editing. Arrested because he did not bow to power.pic.twitter.com/QrCthaUF9Y

View image on Twitter

Cemal Kalyoncu. He knew nothing in his life besides reporting and editing. Arrested because he did not bow to power.pic.twitter.com/QrCthaUF9Y

Ali Akkus. If Turkey has few excellent newsroom editors, he is among the top. Publisher of graft cases. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/uqUQAfFGv6

View image on Twitter

Ali Akkus. If Turkey has few excellent newsroom editors, he is among the top. Publisher of graft cases. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/uqUQAfFGv6

Abdullah Kilic. Supreme irony that he made headlines for investigating 1960 military coup. Arrested on coup charges.pic.twitter.com/jJVILgjRIE

View image on Twitter

Abdullah Kilic. Supreme irony that he made headlines for investigating 1960 military coup. Arrested on coup charges.pic.twitter.com/jJVILgjRIE

Ufuk Sanli. His Al Monitor columns shed light on Turkey’s economy. An avid reader, excellent reporter. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/N3ZV4yAVim

View image on Twitter

Ufuk Sanli. His Al Monitor columns shed light on Turkey’s economy. An avid reader, excellent reporter. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/N3ZV4yAVim

Emre Soncan. To learn anything about the military, he was the reporter to read. Extraordinary journalist. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/DjLqpYrh2u

View image on Twitter

Emre Soncan. To learn anything about the military, he was the reporter to read. Extraordinary journalist. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/DjLqpYrh2u

A talented journalist, unwavering editor. Published a series of court investigations. Now paying the price. Arrestedpic.twitter.com/oBhCBKO2AC

View image on Twitter

A talented journalist, unwavering editor. Published a series of court investigations. Now paying the price. Arrestedpic.twitter.com/oBhCBKO2AC

Hasim Soylemez. A general assignment investigative reporter who wrote about almost anything. Price: Arrested.pic.twitter.com/I0nVq0yySm

View image on Twitter

Mehmet Gundem. Hardly anyone could get away when he asked questions. An interview geek. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/o7f0bdehte

Sahin Alpay. I don’t know anyone else who fought for Turkish democracy more than him. A champion of rights. Arrestedpic.twitter.com/RXH7AselAF

View image on Twitter

Ali Bulac. A powerful mind, one of Turkey’s rare Islamist sociologists. Refused to bow to Erdogan. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/IRG596pU78

Mumtazer Turkone. Tortured in jails after 1980 coup. With exceptional writing, always advocated liberties. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/SixZLfvoHo

View image on Twitter

Mumtazer Turkone. Tortured in jails after 1980 coup. With exceptional writing, always advocated liberties. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/SixZLfvoHo

Hilmi Yavuz. Almost as old as Turkey itself, a great literary mind, an extraordinary poet and columnist. Arrested.pic.twitter.com/hmF1jYM3vw

View image on Twitter

The massive purges have given many analysts reason to believe that Erdogan — who called the failed coup “a gift from God” — is using the incident as an excuse to rid society of those who oppose his rule.

In the wake of roughly 14 terrorist attacks on Turkish soil in just over a year, Erdogan has attempted to significantly expand his presidential powers and quell dissent.

The US generally tries to avoid criticizing Turkey, which has the second-largest military in NATO and is a crucial ally in the fight against ISIS. President Barack Obama has expressed concern in the past about Erdogan’s repressive tendencies, however.

“I’ve said to President Erdogan to remind him that he came into office with a promise of democracy,” Obama said during a press conference at the end of the Nuclear Security Summit in April.

“And Turkey has historically been a country in which deep Islamic faith has lived side by side with modernity and an increasing openness. That’s the legacy that he should pursue rather than a strategy that involves repression of information and shutting down democratic debate.”

The US quickly condemned the attempted overthrow of Erdogan’s government on July 15, however, and called on all parties in Turkey to “support the democratically elected Turkish government.”

In any case, the coup attempt — and the mass purges that have followed — “presents a dilemma to the United States and European governments,” Richard N. Haass, the president of the Council on Foreign Relations, told The New York Times shortly after the uprising was put down.

“Do you support a nondemocratic coup,” or an “increasingly nondemocratic leader?”

Posted on 01/08/2016 in Στα Media

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